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The corner of the building at Philadelphia and Hillcrest.
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The front of Fairview above the main entrance.
Photo taken by Charles Schommer FHS Class of 1944.
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Front of the building facing Philadelphia Drive.
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Detail of architectural work above the main entrance on Philadelphia Drive.
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The orginial 1929 cornerstone at Philadelphia and Hillcrest.
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Detail of the center side entrance facing Hillcrest near the corner of Philadelphia and Hillcrest.

 
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BRUISER the BULLDOG
Fairview High School and our mascot continually reminded us of our ambitions and accomplishments. The school formed the framework and foundation of our character. Bruiser the Bulldog symbolized our spirit and enthusiasm. The bulldog was adopted as the school mascot in 1923. The first bulldog was a Boston Bull but in the later years the mascot became the English Bulldog which is the bulldog we remember.


FAIRVIEW'S COLORS BLUE AND GOLD
Three members of the class of 1918 wrote Fairview's song, "The Blue and Gold". While they were composing the song, they discovered that blue and gold sounded better when put to music than blue and orange, the colors that were chosen in 1909. As a result, Fairview's colors were changed to blue and gold. (That information was taken from our 2001 reunion book.) The song lyrics below were taken from a Souvenir Edition of the School Song sheet music used at the dedication of the addition to Fairview High School on March 30,1955.

Fairview's School Song
"THE BLUE AND GOLD"

Our colors gaily showing
In vict’ry or defeat,
The blue and gold are glowing
Two-thousand strong to greet.
 
Two-thousand greet our banner
Although it is not new,
Uphold its priceless honor
And hail dear old Fairview!
 
Let us hail dear old Fairview,
In truth and loyalty!
We will march in one procession
When the blue and gold we see
Let us proclaim thy vict’ries
Wherever we may be.
 
Hats off to Fairview!
To dear old Fairview!
We are always proud of Thee!

 

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF FAIRVIEW HIGH SCHOOL
Fairview has been a school of transition. Construction initially began on Fairview in the spring of 1900 at Fairview Avenue and Catalpa Drive. With only a handful of students present, school commenced on September 24, 1900. However, due to delays in construction of the building, school commenced at a temporary location at the old courthouse at Third and Main. Ten weeks later the students, faculty and administrators moved into the new building at the corner of Fairview and Catalpa.

Fairview's next transition was moving to the corner of Hillcrest and Philadelphia Drive in 1929 -- its present location. This new location caused an increase in attendance at Fairview and made it necessary after a little over 30 years for an expansion. In 1932, Fairview High School began a new addition. Some of our parents experienced the freshness of this expansion first hand because they were students at Fairview during the thirties. By 1966 Fairview had outgrown the existing facilities and construction on another expansion was started in the fall of 1966.

During the years, Fairview became one of the top schools in the city, the state, and the country. The principals and faculty of Fairview strengthened the scholastic record and the athletic record was also strong. Fairview stood the test of time and the memories will remain forever with those of us who were fortunate enough to be part of Fairview's history and transition.

(The source of this information was the 1967 Fairview High School year book.)

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Prior to the addition.  Maybe late 1930's.
Prior to the addition. Maybe late 1930's.

Floor plan included in the 1962 'Welcome You' booklet.
Floor plan included in the 1962 "Welcome You" booklet.

Photo by Bob Hauff FHS Class of 1963. The photo shows the entry to the school library and the Four Freedom Reliefs displ
Photo by Bob Hauff FHS Class of 1963. The photo shows the entry to the school library and the Four Freedom Reliefs displayed about the doorway.
Close up of the Four Freedom Reliefs above the library doorway.
Close up of the Four Freedom Reliefs above the library doorway.
Photos by Bob Hauff, FHS Class of 1963. The photo shows the first floor Hillcrest hallway heading toward the Philadelphi
Photos by Bob Hauff, FHS Class of 1963. The photo shows the first floor Hillcrest hallway heading toward the Philadelphia Drive main entry.
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Four of the six Robert Koepnick stone reliefs gracing the exterior of the FHS auditorium.  Koepnick was a well known Dayton artist.

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Fairview's athletic field gate which is dated 1930.
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A specially made Rookwood Pottery (Cincinnati, Ohio) fountain which is
dated 1934 and dedicated to Mr. Longnecker and Miss Folger.  Located in the first floor hallway across from the center stairwell.

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The side of the building looking West on Hillcrest.
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Third and Main was always a busy place between classes.
"This School Purposes To Lead Youth Toward
 Healthful, Broadminded, Service-seeking Adult Life."
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A Rookwood fountain located on the second floor in the hallway across from the library.
A Rookwood fountain located on the second floor in the hallway across from the library.

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This World War II motif stained glass window was donated to FHS by the Class of 1945 and dedicated in 1948 in memory of the fifty-one Fairview graduates who died in WW II. It was located in the center stairwell landing leading to the second floor facing Hillcrest. The Art Deco style window, shown below, was located in the stairwell landing near the main office, also facing Hillcrest. This stained glass was installed in 1938. The windows were created by local Ohio artists, Robert and Gertrude Metcalf. They were internationally recognized. Read more about the two large Fairview High School stained glass windows on the "FHS Stained Glass" page. 

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A 1929 fountain created by Rookwood Pottery (Cincinnati, Ohio) which depicts the original Fairview Tower.  Located in the hallway from the cafeteria to the main office.

 

Fairview Dawn booklet from 1934
Fairview Dawn booklet from 1934

Most members of Fairview's Class of 1934 could not afford a yearbook but an alternative idea came to fruition. It was a beautiful booklet that was printed in-house to defray cost. Fairview Dawn was filled with the senior class creative prose and poetry along with pen and ink illustrations and wood-block  prints. The booklet is a keepsake for the graduating class of '34 and another treasure to add to the history of Fairview High. See more and read a story about Fairview Dawn by going to the "Memorabilia" page.


 

Many more photos of the building are located on the "Photo Album" page in an album titled Fairview - The Building. Please take a look!

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