Welcome to the "Memorabilia" section of the Fairview ’66 website. This page represents more than the Class of '66, we are happy to post alumni photos from other Fairview graduating classes too. It will include memorabilia and photos from a variety of FHS alumni at their recent reuions, past events and during earlier school days. Please submit your photos as jpeg files. You may email submissions by contacting Jeri Jones Bland through the "66 Class Directory" page or the "Contact Us" page. Please share your items of interest that we can all enjoy on this Fairview ’66 site.

Image

Shown above and below are the front and back of a 1944 Fairview jumbo post card, nearly 8 1/2" x 11", sent to Fairview alumni serving in the military during WWII.  This post card was addressed to 1943 Fairview graduate Kenneth L. Carder, who was serving in the Navy.  Thank you to his son, Kevin L. Carder, for sending this significant part of Fairview's history to share with all alumni.  To enlarge the message on the back of the post card, please click on the image.

(click on image to enlarge)
(click on image to enlarge)


 

Mr. McFarland's Talk
by Dan Wolfe, FHS Class of 1965

Nineteen and thirty-four, as the old folks might have said it, was not exactly the high water mark of the century. Orson Wells didn’t visit it. Neither did Jules Verne nor Rod Serling. And to the best of my knowledge, you can add Mr. Peabody, Sherman and Marty McFly to the list.

The Great Depression was at its worst, by some measure. The Great Recovery, courtesy in large part of WWII, was yet to make its way to Main Street. Our parents would have been of an age when they were going to high school, just as we did in the ‘60s. And our lily white Dayton View would hardly have been exempt from the suffering.

You didn’t think Mom and Dad came up with all those at-the-dinner-table stories without some first-hand reference, did you? Many a last spoonful of succotash found its way home thanks to the implied threats that accompanied the telling of those tales. And we all knew better than to even think about rolling our eyes when the homily began with, “When I was your age, young man ...”

With unemployment hovering around twenty percent, our Mr. Longnecker and Miss Folger would not have had to look far afield to see the profound effects of this catastrophe. Pick an adjective ... social, economic, cultural, educational ... this perfect storm would have had its way with every aspect of the hearts and minds of our parents, and those charged with making responsible adults out of clueless adolescents

Yeah, good luck with that.

In the interests of wanting all students, regardless of station, to share the pain, there was no yearbook in 1934. If everyone could not afford one, some having one would not be a source of discomfiture to others.

But this generation of our parents was both resourceful and smarter than the average bear. Might there be a way of having their picnic basket cake and eating it too? Going back as far as you care to in Fairview lore, you find there was considerable interest in creative writing ... both prose and poetry. So some crafty band of rebels, of all stripes, students, parents and faculty, saw the opportunity to use that passion as a vehicle to create what would amount to their de facto yearbook. And using their in-house printing equipment, they could defray any significant cost.

Ladies and gentlemen, I give you ...

 

Image

It’s impossible to say how much faculty oversight there was to the project. I’ll guess that there was a fair amount of “positive reinforcement” in terms of what was content and what was left on the cutting room floor. Even the simple Tower News of our time did not go to press without an imprimatur of the powers that be.

Be that as it may, the effort is a wonderful mix of tribute to the talent of Fairview students, while not losing sight of the goal of having a bit of carpe diem that youth want and need to mark the rite of passage that graduating from high school represents. As befits a work of such stature, the first pages allowed for a table of contents where the grade level of the contributing students is denoted with roman numerals. Ooooo.


Then, of course, there was the obligatory dedication to the Founder of the Feast, without whom all things are wanting. 

(click on image to enlarge)
(click on image to enlarge)

The majority of the booklet of just under one hundred pages is devoted to the collection of very short stories and poems. Some authors have multiple works published; others are one-hit-wonders. Some works are, charitably stated, what struggles to escape from the mind of a teenager. Believe me, I know about trite and hackneyed. Mrs. Krehbiel made sure of that. Other submissions are quite good, or, at least, inspired. In any case, you won’t see me offering any of my high school writing here for your review.

The final pages are devoted to blank space for autographs as well as pages of advertisements to help with the costs of publication. 

(click on image to enlarge)
(click on image to enlarge)

And yes, that is an authentic Dorothy M. Herbst you see at the top as she appears to be channeling John Hancock. We’ll start the bidding at $5000.

As with so many things that pass before our eyes, we initially accomplish only a quick and cursory scan ... looking for the unusual, the interesting, the comforting. After all, if there’s something noteworthy, it should jump out and fight its way through the cobwebs to compete successfully for your attention. But I’m fascinated by all things Fairview, so I afforded Fairview Dawn 1934 a second and more comprehensive read.

ZOWIE! POW! BLAM-O! ... in Batman comic book parlance There, nestled in the midst of lesser prose, was Mr. McFarland’s Talk. 

 

(click on image to enlarge)
(click on image to enlarge)

OK, I can wait here if you’d like to go back for a re-read. I won’t tell anyone I saw you moving your finger along the words as you read.

I try not to wear my politics on my sleeve. They are my own. I’m happiest when I can have a conversation with someone and not feel like I need to convert them to my way of thinking. And this writing should be no different. That I have prejudices is not open to debate. I do. And so did my parents before me. Conversations in the living room, the breakfast table and the family car would have made those biases all too evident. But that is not the issue here.

What is, is that this story, this Mr. McFarland’s Talk, offers us so many interesting insights into a time we never knew. Perhaps a Q&A would be the best way to see what makes this story so complex and wonderful. Don’t worry, I’ll do the heavy lifting. Just keep an open mind,

Who was the author, Norman Grieser? We only know what’s in this booklet. He was a senior and a member of the National Honor Society. For his work in Fairview Dawn 1934, he was awarded something referred to as The English Cup, but for his poetry, not this think piece. To the best of my knowledge, he had not been abducted by extra- terrestrials and did not work at Area 51 later in life. That’s it.

Who do we suppose selected this work for publication? Didn’t we cover this already? Suffice it to say, I don’t think “everyone got a trophy just for showing up.” Possibly there was input from the students, but I’d put my money on a teacher/administrator cabal cherry-picking what they felt like.

How prevalent do we think this liberal-for-the-time thinking was? Wow, pretty darn, unless you know something I don’t. Sure, it’s obvious Mr. Longnecker and Miss Folger chose a black person to speak at the assembly, but it would be another twenty-five years before they did/could hire our Mrs. Rowe. Baby steps.

Do we know anything about Mr. McFarland? Nope, and we’re rapidly running out of people to ask. It’s another case where the message survives, but not the messenger.

OK ... now we’ll take a few from the audience.

Is it likely the writer, the one and only Norman Grieser took any heat after the fact? Do ya think?! Were there honked-off parents giving a piece of their mind to whomever had the thankless job of answering the phone at school? Did less enlightened peers engage in a never-ending campaign of name-calling? Not yes ... Hell yes! It probably didn’t make its way to cross-burning, but there had to be some heated conversations over picket fences while spleens were vented.

We have time for one more.

Were any minds changed? Good question. You get a gold star for the day. And I think we all know the answer ... No. But we equally well understand that minds change over, how should we say, geologic time. Just the fact that this happened served to elevate the dialogue and raise the collective consciousness and that’s more than enough for one day.

Oh, to be able to go back in time and learn these answers and so much more.

But every bit the wonderment in imagining, as knowing. Right Miss Oliver?

So maybe nineteen and thirty four was a pretty good year, after all.

 

With most grateful acknowledgement to Arlene and David Gates, teachers at FHS in the mid-‘60s, for passing this copy of Fairview Dawn 1934 down to us to share. 

This booklet contained over 90 pages. Along with the poetry and prose, there are pages that include the Senior National Honor Society Members, Class Officers, illustrations and the Fairview Senior Class of 1934 Rooster (shown directly below). It was a real keepsake for the senior class of 1934 and the school.

(click on image to enlarge)
(click on image to enlarge)
(click on image to enlarge)
(click on image to enlarge)


 
An interesting photo taken by Howard Gorrell, class of '64.
An interesting photo taken by Howard Gorrell, class of '64.


 
Image

A Fairview Memory That Made The News!

Many of us from the sixites will never forget the day Jack Berkemeier, the Class of '63 President, was so happy it's Thursday that he said S.H.I.T. over the loud speaker during the morning announcements. We still talk about it today! Thanks Jack for that memory! Marj Heyduck wrote about Jack in the Dayton news paper.

Image

Image

Jim McLfresh, David Wyse, Murray Horwitz and Carol Scherer all Class of '66 grads.
Jim McLfresh, David Wyse, Murray Horwitz and Carol Scherer all Class of '66 grads.

Image
CLASS OF 1965 45th REUNION WAS HELD 
SEPTEMBER 11, 2010

Names from front row to back row:  Anita Greiser, Kathi Swank, Beckie Smith, Linda Buck, Donna Bloom, Julie Thweatt, Rollin Houser, Tish Sullivan, Paul Schwab, Dee Clingman, Gay Wolfe, Brenda Dever, Brenda Sexton, Glory Cox, Pat Bertsche, Tim Kirkendahl, Jim Houdeshell, Jan Kuhlman, Ginny Dixon, Gwynn Barnes, Dave Carter, Ed Stout, Sandra Livingston, Susi Sower, Bart Weprin, Bill Zile, Jack Farnlacher, George Bondor, Doug Hauff, Larry Cruea, Dave Booren, John Howdeshelt, Dan Wolfe, Bruce Downing, Clyde Lewellen, Charlie Drapp, Bruce Sucher, Oscar Crider, Mike Murphy, Al Donaldson, Andy Waldman, Larry Pollock


 
AXE Reunion photo, September 10, 2010.  Howie Gorrell '64, Tom Kender '66, Ed Stout '65, Jack Berkemeier '63, Susi S
AXE Reunion photo, September 10, 2010. Howie Gorrell '64, Tom Kender '66, Ed Stout '65, Jack Berkemeier '63, Susi Sower '65, Carole Egusa '66

Clyde Mellert and Pam McLeran from the Class of '67 and Billy McLeran the Class of '69
Clyde Mellert and Pam McLeran from the Class of '67 and Billy McLeran the Class of '69

Herman Romeiser the Class of '40. He is standing next to an old FHS banner which hung at Nancy Marker's house. Herman
Herman Romeiser the Class of '40. He is standing next to an old FHS banner which hung at Nancy Marker's house. Herman and Nancy worked together on the Alumni Banquet.

Submitted by Virginia Emminger and Evan R.'Dick' Jones, both from FHS class of 1940
Submitted by Virginia Emminger and Evan R."Dick" Jones, both from FHS class of 1940

Pam McLeran and Jim Donaldson from the Class of '67 and Nancy Marker the Class of '66, attending the Class of '67 For
Pam McLeran and Jim Donaldson from the Class of '67 and Nancy Marker the Class of '66, attending the Class of '67 Fortieth Reunion held in 2007

Nancy Marker '66, Don Moshos '66 and his wife Sue, attending the Class of '67 Reuinon in 2007
Nancy Marker '66, Don Moshos '66 and his wife Sue, attending the Class of '67 Reuinon in 2007

Little League photo submitted by Don Moshos class of '66
Little League photo submitted by Don Moshos class of '66
Can you help us identify the Little League players in these three photos?
Little League photo submitted by Don Moshos class of '66
Little League photo submitted by Don Moshos class of '66

Little League photo submitted by Don Moshos class of '66
Little League photo submitted by Don Moshos class of '66

Thanks to Jim McLefresh for this program from a Fairview Elementary School production.  Shown above is the cover.
Thanks to Jim McLefresh for this program from a Fairview Elementary School production. Shown above is the cover.
Fairview Elementary. I Hear America Singing program page 1.
Fairview Elementary. I Hear America Singing program page 1.
Fairview Elementary.  I Hear America Singing program page 2.
Fairview Elementary. I Hear America Singing program page 2.
Fairview Elementary.  I Hear America Singing program page 3.
Fairview Elementary. I Hear America Singing program page 3.
Fairview Elementary.  I Hear America Singing program page 4.
Fairview Elementary. I Hear America Singing program page 4.
FHS Class of 1965 40th Reunion in 2005
FHS Class of 1965 40th Reunion in 2005

Al Donaldson and Susi Kruskamp Class of '65
Al Donaldson and Susi Kruskamp Class of '65

Dave Froning and Barrie Fogarty the Class of '65
Dave Froning and Barrie Fogarty the Class of '65

Alumni from the Class of 1965. Tim Kirkendall, Al Donaldson, Pat O'Connell and Jim Swank enjoying their 40th Class Reun
Alumni from the Class of 1965. Tim Kirkendall, Al Donaldson, Pat O'Connell and Jim Swank enjoying their 40th Class Reunion in 2005.

Class of '65 grads at their 40th Reunion in 2005. The reunion was held at a private club in Enon, Ohio,
Class of '65 grads at their 40th Reunion in 2005. The reunion was held at a private club in Enon, Ohio,

Shirley Demeter Class of '64 and Susi Kruskamp Class of '65
Shirley Demeter Class of '64 and Susi Kruskamp Class of '65

Guy Kennedy the Class of '64 and Steve Grove the Class of '63
Guy Kennedy the Class of '64 and Steve Grove the Class of '63

Steve Grove the Class of '63
Steve Grove the Class of '63

Susi Kruskamp the Class of '65, Steve Grove the Class of '63, Nancy Marker the Class of '66
Susi Kruskamp the Class of '65, Steve Grove the Class of '63, Nancy Marker the Class of '66

 
Image

Image

Cornell Heights 8th Grade Class Picnic
June 5, 1962 at Inland Activities Center

4th row in back:  Bob Perkins, Bill Fournier, Vera Fisch, Pat Barney, Adrienne Kaplan, Phyllis Teplitz, Donna Sullivan, Gail Patterson, Linda Barna, Linda Fox, Pat Jessee, Mary Alice Combs, Connie Ross, Sandy White, Greg Valentine, David Witt, Chuck Whistler, Danny Behr, Ralph Bechtolt, Dale Sears, Jim Ramsey, Shep Koss, Andy Allen, Dan Rappaport, Jon Katz, Bill Franklin, Gary Clark  3rd row:  Murray Horwitz, Carol Kehl, Cynthia Oakley, Sharlyn Stephens, Karen Lorton, Patsy Walsh, Sultana Kerringan, Debbie Cusher, Sharon Gutmann, Carolyn Berger, Linda Woditsch, Shirley Deardorff, Lynn Young, Sandra Lowell, Judy Levy, Pat Hershey, Don Moshos, Bill Schlieper, Jim Dollar, Keith Black, Jim Mills, Bob Long, Tom Jordan, Jim Swanson, Bruce Cohen, Tim Tatman, Scott Kelso, Sanford Donoff, Steve Gershow   2nd row:  Karen Flayler, Linda Young, Leslie Bacon, Cindy Griep, Marlene Greenfield, Diana Recker, Barbara Austin, Sandie Sturdivant, Jeri Jones, Gail Pheterson, Cindy Ellison, Suzi Welbaum, Nancy Abrahams, Candy Goldflies, Susan Pfanner, Trisha Lewis, Carole Scherer, JoAnn Murray, Susan Rubenstein, Polly Grimsley, Susy Fishman, Susan Faul, Alice Nierenberg, Elinore Norfluss, Tom Buckley, Russell Good  1st Row: Dan Hecker, Alan Gelman, Bob Wenger, Elliot Fishman, Elliot Allen, David Opper, Alan Colley, Brent Byram, Jim Simmons, Arden Seaman, David Hardesty, Chuck Douglas, Brooks Bowles, Bill Browder, Joe Dixon, Frank Brooks, Jerry Cusher, Tim Pleich, David Deinzer, Charlie Berry, Walter Rosenbloom. (It appears that there are four people from the class roster that did not attend the picnic. Tish Seabrook, Gail Williamson, Bill Briede, Bruce Trowman.)

Image

Fairview Elementary School 1961-1962, submitted by Mike Levitt

First (Bottom) Row:  Kathy Allen, Scott Harris, Sue Blackford, George Kokenakis, Ginn, Dixie Wilson,  Kimmel, Selenia Cannons, Sandra Brandenburg, Kenny Tressler, Larry Mitchell, ­­Holmeister, Alan Gaines, "Cookie" Cookston, Human, Hall. Second Row:  Ron Frydman, Steve Corum, Leonard Grieves, Andi Cowan, Stan Laight, Michael Levitt, Cleo Shaffer, Dave Mann, Marsha Rafal, Randy Hathaway, Phil Tudor, Jack Steinfeld, Jenny Gaylor, Ron Utz, Mark Vangrov, Jacobson, Blackford. Third Row:  Mike Smith, Linda Cooper, Ottie Calvert, Barbara Lewis, Chris Whisler, Vicki Frankowitz, Melanie McNaughton, Don Kitain, Pauline Pawloski, Willie Griffith, Lorene Mercer, Ray Jones, Sue Simon, ?, Marty Hoover, Elliot Slutzsky, Darlene Engle, Dave Wilkerson, Charles Shoup. Fourth Row:  Tom Kramer, Susan Harris, Earl Scheidecker, Susan Bowe, Linda Poynter, Bruce Collins, Sue Fitterman, Gary Foldflies, Linda Stevens, John Ade, Ron Tritch, Ginny Dilts, Steve Wilson, Linda Cremeens, Bill Kistner, Joyce Rossell, Al Weglage, Mike Bowers, Peter Longiaru, Sharon Wilson, Ken Bailey. Fifth Row:  Vicki Jackson, Reed Putnam, Pat Kirk, Kathy Taylor, Don Williams, Bob Murdock, Susan Behney, ?, Gibbs, Claudia Leflar, Dave Hottle, Mary Smith, Ken Christ, Judy Sheets, Jim McLefresh, Bob Schwabe, Diane Aselton, Dave Todd, Nancy Marker, Marshall Case, Bonnie Bloom, Rick Burroughs. Sixth Row:  Karen White, Howard Kemp, Peter Austin, Rick McCune, Dave Talley, Mary Drumm, Dave Blough, ?, Forest Midlan, John Pichler, Anne Macek, Jim Kostoff, Ed Fuller, Marc Jennings, Janice Folker

Fairview Elementary Kindergarten 1952-53 class photo, submitted by Dan Wolfe FHS Class of '65
Fairview Elementary Kindergarten 1952-53 class photo, submitted by Dan Wolfe FHS Class of '65

Cornell Heights Kindergarten, 1953-54
Cornell Heights Kindergarten, 1953-54
Fairview Elementary School class photo of 7th grade 1959-60, submitted by Dan Wolfe FHS Class of '65
Fairview Elementary School class photo of 7th grade 1959-60, submitted by Dan Wolfe FHS Class of '65

Fairview Elementary School class photo of 3rd grade 1955-56, submitted by Dan Wolfe FHS Class of '65
Fairview Elementary School class photo of 3rd grade 1955-56, submitted by Dan Wolfe FHS Class of '65

Cornell Heights 3rd Grade, 1955-56
Cornell Heights 3rd Grade, 1955-56
Remember our dreaded report cards. This is one from the second grade of a Fairview Elementary classmate.
Remember our dreaded report cards. This is one from the second grade of a Fairview Elementary classmate.

A senior class report card from one of our Fairview High School classmates. This is a report card any parent would be pr
A senior class report card from one of our Fairview High School classmates. This is a report card any parent would be proud of!

Kindergarten 1954, Loos Elementary School, submitted by Bill Bridges, FHS class of '66
Kindergarten 1954, Loos Elementary School, submitted by Bill Bridges, FHS class of '66

Loos School Kindergarten 1954 (afternoon session)

Teacher: Mrs. Walther.  From left to right.  4th Row: Debbie Kothman, Darlene Glaze, Barbara Dineen, Sharon Sanders, David Mitchell, Carole Egusa, Sondra Spraley, Gayle Jewett, Nancy Havens.  3rd Row:  Rosie Stollger, Patty Crume, John Bodey, Bonnie Shepherd, Glenn Harris, Kathleen Clarke, Valerie Seiple, Marsha Kling, Steve Williams.  2nd Row:  Carol Smith, Jane Hoffman, Debbie karch, William Bridges, Martha Curtner, Jean Yoder, Larry Bell, Dorothy Parker, Karol Weir.  1st Row:  Harry Stevenson, Fritz Chapman, David Dolph, David Eckart, John Winters, Bobby Yound, Tommy Pumerill, Jimmy Bodikar.

Image